Thursday, October 27, 2016

525-Session 8--The Flipped Classroom!

Before we get started, please make sure 
you have voted in the poll above.

Over the past few weeks we've been slowly transitioning towards learning how to use technology to aid in teaching and learning.  The next step in this evolution is to merge your face-to-face teaching with some of these 'blended learning' tools to create what is called, "The Flipped Classroom."  It's turning the traditional classroom on its head.


Flipped Classroom
Created by Knewton





Many of you may have heard of this.  Here's a brief introduction:



The concept is really simplified here (obviously given the penguins). You don't have to always make your own videos or screencasts (which we still can cover more in-depth this semester).  You can always just borrow from others.  After all, why recreate the wheel, but let's learn a little more about this by joining a discussion group on Edweb.net that focuses specifically on the flipped classroom.  Not only do they have a group of like minded educators who want to learn about using technology to teach others, but they have discussion groups and a list of archived webinars for you to pick from and watch.

So now please take a break from this page and visit: http://www.edweb.net/flipped You'll need to create an account, and then join the group, then watch the recorded webinar,  "Flipped Learning Primer Part I: Basics of Flipped Learning"

After watching the webinar take the corresponding quiz to earn the CE.


Once you have taken the quiz and earned your CE, come back to this page and watch this more in-depth video:




Now I'd like you to think this week about the different ways you may 'flip' your own classroom and reflect on the concept this week, but before you do that you should know that there are always two sides to a new initiative, so let's end this week with some criticisms of flipping.




Good luck this week. Don't get too overwhelmed, and I look forward to hearing about the connections you may make to your future classroom environment.

Thank you Paul for helping as a Facilitator this week. Please email me when you are finished.

This week we have both Gail and Heidi. Good luck ladies!




46 comments:

  1. Hello! It's a nice evening to be home doing homework! We are moving forward and thinking about flipping our classrooms. I found it easy to think about flipping classrooms in regard to Bloom's Taxonomy. For example, in a flipped classroom, the learning outcomes achieved outside of the classroom would be to remember, understand, and apply. These are the "lower level" thinking skills, according to Bloom's Taxonomy. The teacher would select the content and the delivery method (such as a video lecture.) Students would be required to complete this part at home. The in class time is the most valuable, and it is here that the upper level thinking skills (Learning Outcomes) would be discovered and utilized. These would include analyzing, evaluating and creating. In class, the teacher would create an active learning activity, coach students, give individual attention, and assess. I have a question - What would you do if your student did not view the video at home, and came to class unprepared for the in class activity?

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    1. Hi Gail, That is a tough question as you would have to consider many things. So if we put aside barriers such as not having the technology at home to utilize and just focus on the fact that the student just slacked off and did not do the at home lecture, you would then have to consider how this would effect the rest of the class that did do the work. I think you would have to come up with something that is the least disruptive to the class. If it happened only once, they could quietly sit in the back and watch the video in class and then if time permits, join the group for the higher level, hands on activity. If it was a regular occurrence, talk to the student, get to the bottom of what is going on. If not, a bit of after school detention to do the work may have to be an option. Some kids just don't like change and have a hard time focusing. Also, the fact that they will now have to work hard and really participate in class may be difficult to overcome. I have a really hard time being "on display" in the learning environment. I think that if I had a flipped classroom when I was younger I may have been a whizzz at math because I would have been able to master the skills prior to being put on the spot. Something to think about..

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    2. Hi Gail,

      Very thought provoking question. My first thought is that if the student does not view the videos and is unprepared for class, they should not receive credit for the assignment. Of course, as Chris pointed out, the instructor could reach out to the student to see why the work was not done. However, at the end of the day, flipped classroom or not, I believe that the student must be responsible to do the work assigned. If not, no credit!

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    3. Hi All!
      Gail, I agree that Bloom's is a good way to frame thinking about this. I like the idea of a student being able to view and review a video multiple times in order to prepare for class.

      In response to your question about preparedness, the reason for not viewing needs to be uncovered. Many of my adult students consider themselves computer literate but what we have found is that they are good at certain tasks (downloading music, Facebook posts, maybe Twitter) but don't have strong abilities when it comes to other things like creating accounts/profiles, writing and sending an email or adding an attachment. I would have a non-confrontational one-on-one with the student to figure out their lack of participation and go from there.

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    4. All good points regarding how to handle a student that does not watch the video. I want to add by saying that there is a huge homeless population among teens as well as domestic violence being part of the picture, I do not think that would be an easy fix.
      I am on the fence of flipped classrooms especially for elementary and secondary education unless those students show a higher level of comprehension and responsibility. I think I may have missed it in the videos but I do not remember if anyone mentioned how soon into the year the flipped classroom is introduced.
      I intern for a certificate program with students 18 years old and older. This would be ideal for a small portion of those student but most of them do not possess the higher level thinking skills nor the equipment to participate in a flipped class program even if they are supplied with DVD's.
      I realize that this type of learning and teaching is 21st century techniques but it takes a lot of effect on the part of the student that some of them will not and do not possess. I know it sounds kind of cruel but its the truth.

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    5. Though I agree with Christine in the fact that we do need to get to the bottom of why the student isn't watching the videos, I also very much agree with Paul. Students need to be accountable for their actions. This they don't do the work then they don't get the grade. But I feel that can be unfair if materials aren't available at home and that is where things can get difficult. So I believe that a first offense is forgivable but after that, a teacher should get down to why they aren't doing the assignment and if it is a simple I didn't feel like it then they don't get a grade but uf they truest don't have the materials at home allow them to stay after school for a little to do the work on a computer at school.

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  2. Hi Gail. This is a very clear description of the transformation of a normal classroom into a pedagogical, technological driven flipped one. As far as your question regarding the student who didn’t prepare for class, I would say that it all depends on some pertinent variables. You would need to know exactly why they weren’t prepared. As we are all adult learners, we know that there are many barriers that come with being in school as an adult. I wouldn’t focus on it too much and would maybe try to contact the student afterwards to see if there is anything going on that you could help with.
    Sharyn

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  3. The flipped classroom is something that I am very interested in. As most of you know by know, I deal with training departmental personnel on entering job records into the e-Campus system. When these people come into my training they have no clue as to what it is all about. As I start going over information, I can see the deer in the headlights look on their faces and I am constantly reassuring them that this will make sense by the time we are done.
    Having them view a video or online lecture ahead of time would give them a little background of what the process is before coming to class. This would aid in the transfer of knowledge from knowing to doing as well. Since they have some knowledge of the concept and I can spend the classroom time on answering questions and helping them with real data entry.

    They would also be able to review the lecture at their desk whenever they needed a refresher course.

    If a person did not watch the video and was unprepared for the training class, I would definitely have to take into consideration the barriers they have faced in the office. Many of these employees are new and are being hit with learning many different modules and software while being thrown into an active office with basically no training. So I would be empathetic to that and would give them an area where they could watch the videos and then participate in the classroom activities once they were done.

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    1. Paula I agree, I can see this being very valuable to the type of work that you do. I like how you thought about the person who may not have watched the video. That is a hurdle for you for sure. I like how you created another learning environment for that person; aka "A back up plan." I am going to make a note of that as I can see that is a useful tool in my toolbox. Thank you for sharing that.

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    2. I'm very interested too, Paula. What I am envisioning is a flipped classroom experience to convey critical information for new staff coming on board! We have so much grant driven protocol to convey along with our local program expectations that it is near impossible to for new staff to absorb any great amount of it in the two pre-weeks of preparation they may or may not get, depending on when they join our team. It would be a great way to reengage returning staff before we meet in August so that we can hit the ground running with the new initiatives for that particular school year.

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  4. Hi everyone! Thank you for allowing me to help you along this week. We are a little more than halfway through our class and we have learned so many different things about technology. Now it is our chance to think about how we can use many of these concepts in our own classroom or future ones.

    This week’s learning content is about “Flipping the Classroom.” It is exciting to see how to move from a traditional (Ferris Bueller) type of classroom to a more interactive learning classroom. By doing so, we are able to have the students learn the material at home and then come prepared to the classroom and engage in a more interactive learning experience. As we learn be successful in doing this, it’s important to know your audience, to be secure in your content and know your objectives. It’s helpful as Practitioners to do some extra research in a variety of ways on the concepts we are delivering so we can be prepared for any questions.

    However, although this experience can be a positive for our students, there are some pitfall to think about as we try to meet our own expectations. Keep videos presentations interesting and to the point. Long drawn out videos will make students feel like they are back in the lecture hall, and you may lose their interest. Also, too many videos can lose a student’s interest as it can overkill the main point or make students confused. If your subject matter is very deep or cannot be conveyed in a timely video, research suggests to make two video’s to be shown at another date.

    Another thing to consider is that just because students are in a flipped classroom, doesn’t mean they will automatically learn what you are teaching. Feedback and interactive questions will help us make sure learning transfer has occurred. We are still needed to help explain content. As we have dates and deadlines for material, we will be able to find the students who are not moving forward and help them get back on track. Please watch this short video on overcoming some hurdles when using a flipped classroom. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwvXFlLQClU

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    1. Wow Heidi, You just helped me answer Gail's first question more fully. I really liked the tips in the video about adding in safeguards so that you know your students are watching at home. You can embed short quizzes for them to answer or have a question that they have to answer and bring with them to class the next day. Great video.

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    2. Great brief video, Heidi.

      I agree with Chris's comments. I also like the tip that we do not need to make a Hollywood production out of it. It's also good to think about how much is enough- I liked the reminder that we don't have to go all or none.

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    3. Informative video. I like the idea of embedding mini quizzes and reviewing their notes to check if they are actually paying attention and learning something.

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    4. You are so right, Heidi. Keeping student's attention is difficult. The video itself can't tell if students are following along or falling asleep. Interaction has to be key. There is also the time limit issue. In my online class (that I am teaching...a math class) I assign the videos which are provided by the publisher as homework. Students must watch the videos before they can do the problems (I have it setup so they are locked out of the graded work until they watch). The problem though is that students can just open the videos and then close them again without watching them. I guess I don't have a problem with that if a student can get the concept just from reading the book, but I see by the results that some of the students who could most benefit from the videos aren't fully utilizing them.

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    5. Excellent video Heidi. I think I'll incorporate that next time I teach this course.

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  5. I liked the idea of posing a question in the video, and the students need to bring the answer to class.

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    1. I like the idea of having a one or two question quiz at the start of the class. The question should come directly from the video....meaning if they watch they will have the answer! Simple 100% just for watching the video.

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  6. How would I use a flipped classroom? Well, my husband's company could benefit from flipped training. They are required to do KSA's Knowledge, skills and Ability trainings and OJT, On the job trainings. The problem is, they do not have enough skilled people to go around and do these trainings individually. I propose they have those skilled, knowlegeable employees, make interesting training videos that other employees could watch privately and then have the 2 hour session once a month to really dive into any and all questions and issues they may have. They could all come together and brainstorm what they learned and create new and better strategies.

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    1. Sounds good. When I was in the private sector all initial training was web based to an extent, and this was the case for me over 15 years ago. I think in the workplace, it is still good to have one on one time with a trainer, but the trainer can make more effective use of his/her time using this model.

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  7. Great concepts Heidi. You tied everything together nicely. I thought the video was very helpful. And I'm glad that you reinforced that a live faculty member is still important and relevant even in today's technologically driven classrooms.
    Sharyn

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  8. One thing I really like and think is very important about the flipped classroom is that one can view the lecture as many times as needed to get the information down. I am not sure about the rest of you, but I know that in class I am struggling to take notes and not miss anything that is said. The flipped classroom gives the student the time needed to take down whatever notes they want and to review the lecture if they missed anything.

    Another great thing about this is for the shy student, they may be more likely to speak up in class if they understand the material better, which I think the flipped classroom will accomplish for them.

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    1. Paula, I also like that one is able to view the lecture/video as many times as needed. I think that just knowing that the lecture is there to view over and over, reduces a great amount of anxiety for students. They can actually relax and take their time comprehending what is being taught, rather than worrying if they got the everything down on paper.
      Luz

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    2. Paula, I think you have hit it right on the head. If we use recorded lectures students always have the ability to see it as many times as needed. This can save a student many frustrating hours, especially in a difficult subject. We have all been in the situation where you take good notes but the instructor says something that we miss...

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  9. Here are 3 easy techniques to try if you would like to attempt a trial run........
    http://www.flippedclassroomworkshop.com/getting-started-with-flipped-classroom-easier-than-you-think/

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  10. Hi Gail,

    That link contained great information, thanks for sharing! I like the WSQ "whisk" technique to help encourage students to be more engaged in the flipped classroom setting. Basically, that is what I do when I'm watching videos for classes. In conjunction with the Educannon tool that allows you to add questions in a video, the pointers that you found will help us be more successful in flipping the classroom.

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  11. Hi Paula,
    I too am a note taker as writing helps me process what I am hearing. For my English speakers of other languages (ESOL) learners, videos would be a great support to increase confidence by modeling correct speech and giving them the opportunity to practice in their own settings. I would imagine the classroom participation would increase once their confidence does with the practice. Exciting!!

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    1. Leslie, I completely agree with you. I also think that a flipped classroom can help ESOL learners, who are also parents, understand what his/her child is learning in school in order to hopefully help their children better understand concepts or answer any questions they may have. For example, as a child, I remember asking my parents for help with my math homework (division). I found out very quickly that division in the US looks different from division in Colombia. My parents would try to show me how to divide the only way they knew how, but I had to learn it the way I was taught in school. This created a breakdown in communication because I could not explain to them how my teacher had shown me during class, and they could not translate they way they knew how to divide well enough for me to understand it. And since they had limited English speaking/reading skills, referring to my math book was useless. I wonder if this would have played out differently had they SEEN a video of someone dividing the "American" way? Perhaps it was all they would have needed to figure it out and help me.
      Luz

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  12. Gail, those techniques are great. They can be applied to the business sector as well as educational settings. It is important to have a tool that allows so much flexibility. Thanks for the link.
    Sharyn

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  13. It's worth noting that everyone who provided an opinion (in relation to my question regarding what to do with a student who is unprepared for class,) the answers all suggested approaching the student and asking what the teacher can do to help. There was no mention of "punishment," there was only an awareness of the need to help the adult learner overcome whatever barrier they are facing. We know that adult learners can bring with them institutional, situational and behavioral barriers. As we have been taught, we need to assist our students whenever, and wherever, we can.

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  14. In "Flipping the Classroom" as a practitioner we should always consider building in a reflective activity to have students think about what they learned. This can help them see the relevance of learning and can help them with practical applications. What kind of reflective activity might you put in your own work?

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    1. Good question Heidi. For my training program I am creating a blog dedicated to job exploration, seeking and interviewing skills for college students. In terms of reflective activity, I think I would ask my students to briefly reflect on how he/she would answer certain interview questions after watching a video on interviewing. I would then have them participate in mock interviews the next day in class or watch a video of a mock interview. I would then have them reflect on how they would change their initial answers having experienced an interview.
      Luz

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    2. Those are very helpful activities, Luz. We have even video taped our students mock interviewing each other. They then, as a class, review the videos and critique both the interviewer and interviewee. When a student has the support of a strong cohort, this is a constructive learning experience. People are amazed especially with their own body language that they are not aware of projecting. It's been a very helpful learning tool for our student to prepare.

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    3. Great idea Luz. Professional development is part of the certificate program where I intern and video tapping is a great way to critique the students while doing a mock interview. In the past, my instructor would grade the students on specific points during the interview process. Points that they are well aware of before this process takes place. It would be helpful for the students to actually see what was done correctly or needed to be worked on. Instead of a verbal critique.

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    4. I am a kinesthetic learner and I believe that after a flipped lesson having them demonstrate a skill or creating a skit of some sort based on their learnings

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  15. Heidi, Building in a reflective activity is a great way to give the student a vested interest in the project. If they have to think about how they would use this information in practice, like we do with our studies, it helps them retain the information and gives them the ability to apply what they have learned in the future to create. Bloom's Taxonomy: remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate and create.

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  16. Great idea Heidi. I think a good activity would be one that would fall in line with the learning outcomes of the course. That way, it would tie everything together and let the instructor know that learning has occurred.

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    1. This is true, Sharyn. We have had teachers develop rubrics for grading presentations or projects. The teacher, sometimes classmates and the student all grade using the rubric. The teachers find it helps the students to stay focused on particular skills. The student who is presenting is usually the one who grade themselves the hardest on the rubric. The rubrics also frame for students the difference between poor, average, good and excellent. I think that makes higher goals more attainable because they are more concrete.

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  17. As we heard in one of our assigned videos, the flipped classroom is a stepping stone, or a bridge, it is not the answer to all educational problems. Follow this link for the 5 best practices for a flipped classroom: https://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipped-classroom-best-practices-andrew-miller

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  18. Good morning All,
    I found it interesting that John Sowarsh spoke about not planning his "newly freed" classroom time well when he flipped his classroom. To me, providing time for more in depth and hands on learning would be the motivation for flipping the classroom.

    I wonder, though, about when students hit a saturation point. There is so much information available now that we are inundated 24/7. While I love the flexibility of technology as a teaching tool, it will take me a while to understand and master how much is enough so that I can optimize its use and not drown my students who need to learn content. Just because we can present material much fancier and at an accelerated pace does not mean it is learned as quickly.

    I also wonder about alternate methods of teaching a concept. All students are not capable of viewing one method and acquiring the knowledge. What about the other modalities of learning? Are these all addressed in the follow-up activities? Our kinesthetic learners would be frustrated and leave our program if they are not getting enough experience to increase their knowledge.

    Could one of our experienced classroom teachers please let me know if you have tried this? How you determined how often and how much to use? How receptive were your students? Does success vary depending on student age? Content area? Thank you in advance for your answers.

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    1. There is one thing that I find both exciting but also a little bit frightening. There is a big push at the early college level, especially in remedial level math, to use alternate formats. i.e. students working on computers and teachers circulating around to assist students. While I like the idea of exploring different models it does sometimes make my hair stand on end when I hear my job described as that of a facilitator. With that said, I want to make the point about the saturation point. I have found that this can happen with learning management systems and it is important to have the appropriate control checks in place to make sure students are challenged but not overwhelmed.

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  19. Hi Leslie,
    While I cannot answer your above questions, I wanted to share a conversation that I had at work today. We were discussing how in the near future the traditional classroom will look very different - in fact, may even be eliminated. Students all learn at a different pace and thrive when different techniques are used. Having virtual classrooms will allow students to learn in a way that benefits them individually and at a schedule that works for them. Until then, I think that integrating as many different types of learning styles would be important - but would need to be monitored closely.
    Sharyn

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  20. A flipped classroom is definitely a great idea but I feel it all depends on the district you work in. The SES in a lot of districts are not what all teachers are ready for. Not all students grew up with what we have and may not have computers and Internet access at home. But I feel that allowing an occasional in class flipped classroom experience might be what the students need to have fun in class, they wouldn't feel like every class they go to is just them sitting and listening to you lecture. It appeals to visual and auditory learners and by adding hands on activities to do while watching the video in class it appeals to the kinesthetic learners as well.

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  21. I think the flipped classroom has a lot of potential when it comes to helping students for whom the regular education system hasn't served. To some extent we have had various alternative models for a long time at the college level. Students have always been able to take courses in a lab environment, and recently a few of us have started offering courses using the ALEKs system. The system is optimally designed for module based work and it is designed to require mastery rather than just keep students busy doing homework.

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