Thursday, November 17, 2016

525-Session 11--The Flipped Classroom--Part 2


Welcome back!  As you know, our class is scheduled for Thursdays and next week is T-Day!  Therefore, we will have two weeks before our next class/session.

Now I gave a lot of thought to where we are in our discussions and your motivations for taking this class, so for the first part of Session 11 I decided to include the content below because a number of you this semester teach at the community college level or work with a population that is similar to what is called, "ABE" (Adult Basic Education).

Therefore, you have a choice for the first half of this week's work.  You may spend it hearing from, learning from, and discussing the connections that we can make, with three professors who are participating on a panel called, "Contextualized Curriculum for Developmental and Adult Basic Education (ABE) at Community Colleges"


Click on the image above to view this. Please follow the directions closely when downloading the necessary software.

Please take your time going through this webinar and come back a second time when you are finished to complete your week's comments and reflections below.

OR

you can continue with your training on the 'flipped classroom' by participating in the "Flipped Classroom Pathway" here on Sophia.org    You'll learn how to use videos and podcasts as instructional tools to increase student engagement and support. The Flipped Classroom Pathway is designed to make the best use of face-to-face time with students while also providing them the opportunities to revisit important concepts. Explore the goals and benefits of the flipped classroom to maximize your student learning outcomes.  You'll need to sign up for a free account with Sophia.org, so if the link above doesn't work, then once you are logged into the sight, do a search for either the "Flipped Classroom Pathway" or "What is the Flipped Classroom?"  and then complete all four lessons.  Once you have completed that, come back and share out your thoughts.

Lastly, a little fun.  Visit this site list and play with several of these 'collaboration' tools.  Not all of them are useful for Adult Education, but many are easily transferable across the age spectrum.  Report back to us on one or two of them and whether or not you can see their integration into your future workplace setting.





Part II-A

In Part II-A we will be learning about some tools and resources to help guide you when you have either flipped your class, turned your PD program into an online course, or even if you are just blending your learning modules.

Please try to watch this webinar below before Sunday night. When you are finished, come back to this blog and post your comments and reflections. The directions for Part II-B of Session 11 are below.



Click on the image above for Part II-A's webinar.


Part II-B

You will find the second half of this week's session (Part 1-B) accessible here.

When finished, please return to the class blog and post any comment or reflections.





I would like you to have some time to go through this material before we shift gears and move on to broader, more far-reaching, content on the topic of: "Open Education Resources" and the positive impact on your professional lives, so I won't be uploading that until after the holiday.

Enjoy the time with your friends and family and give thanks for all the blessings in our lives.





73 comments:

  1. Sounds good, have a great Thanksgiving everyone!

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  2. Well I decided to go with the second option and watched more on how to flip a classroom. I uploaded a powerpoint that I started into my tutorial. I think it is great that you can incorporate podcasts, powerpoints, webcasts, articles, chat rooms, blogs and live question and answer sessions into these tutorials as they will address different learning styles such as kinistheic, auditory and visual learners. The point of the flipped classroom is for teachers to help students develop into reflective, responsible and self directed learners. This format also promotes more student to student learning which is right up my ally as I feel strongly about networking and collaborating. Tips to remember when planning: know your objectives, keep lessons clear, concise and to the point. For elementary students 8 minutes, middle school and high school 8-12 and college 12-20. Students will hopefully come to class ready to apply, discuss and make connections which gives teachers more time to help problem solve and really work on issues and making deeper connections to the subject matter.

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    1. Hi Chris, I agree that the flipped classroom is a great way to encourage your students to become self directed learners. I think the key is that the students put in the effort and review the materials so that they arrive at class ready to contribute to the discussion. The class sessions should be more productive and enriching when the learners come prepared with anything they may be unclear about.

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    2. Christine,
      One thing I like about interactive presentations such as podcasts, power points, etc... is the ability to occasionally stop and and pose a question to my students as part of the interaction. I think this improves student comprehension considerably when they are forced to stop think about things before they move on.

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  4. I watched the webinar Office hours for online facilitators and feel that webinars such as this are very helpful as they open up different ways of dealing with the challenges that teachers face. Some of the biggest challenges were: Time, facilitating can be a time consuming 24/7 task, engagement, how do we keep our students engaged. They talked about using things such as Voki, pixi clip, zoom, remind and google classroom. Many of these I have never heard of. I will absolutely check them out. It seems that participating in interactive webinars allows the opportunity to collaborate with others and learn from one another. What a great webinar series this is. Finally, momentum. I find that keeping a blog going can be challenging and keeping the momentum, especially if it is topic specific can be very hard. I am looking forward to the time when I can focus on my blogs content and then hopefully get it going. When you have "barriers" such as school, work and other time constraints, it is hard to keep the momentum going. I think Tai will have no trouble keeping her blog going as it is a cause near and dear to her heart. You go girl!

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    1. Chris, Thanks! It can be a challenge to find content or time for my blog. I notice in one of Daves comments, that you can create an email and send it to your blog. I find this much quicker and i can do it from anywhere. It's super easy. Just go to your settings, email and then you set up an email to send your blogs to. Boom! I hope this helps :)

      -tai

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    2. I also think webinars are a great convenient tool for collaborating and training. In HR, many of us engage in webinars to learn about new processes and software we are using. The fact that most of the people we deal with are in California or some other part of the United States make Webinars a wonderful tool for us to be able to meet and collaborate.

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    3. Hello Tai, Your tip did help. It took me a few minutes to figure out but I did and already used it to post to my blog. This makes it so easy to post from anywhere really quick and easy. Thank you for sharing. Go to blog settings, email and then under posting using email, add in the secret words to your email and now you are ready to go. Email your posts or photos to the new email address and bingo, it's there on your blog within seconds. Thanks Tai

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    4. Awesome sauce!.. im glad i could help :)
      -tai

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    5. Christine,
      I have to agree with you about the challenges that come with keeping up with a blog. I think coming up with topics on what to blog about is the hardest part. I have found myself typing and deleting a post so many times that I finally grow frustrated and say forget it, haha. It's not easy and I have a new found respect for dedicated bloggers who post 2-3 times a week.

      Luz

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    6. While watching the webinars, it seemed very helpful to have someone tasked with watching the typed comments. Especially with a large group which were adding lots of comments quickly. It would be quite distracting to have to teach and follow the comments. This may be a good oportunity to have a student incharge and let them direct that portion. Thoughts?
      -tai

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  5. I have listened to and/or read many different definitions of the flipped classroom. In my opinion, the most important point of the flipped classroom is that the teacher is present when the student is actually working on solving the problem. I remember many times, as a student (mostly in math class - ugh - do not enjoy math) when I was given homework assignments. I would try to complete my homework, but I would get stuck on an example and could go no further. As the Sophia video states, in a traditional classroom, students are sent home to do their homework with no guidance. In the flipped classroom, you (the teacher,) and their classmates, are present when the student may run into a problem.
    This video also states that when you flip your classroom, it is never "completed." It is a constant work in progress; with modifications being made according to your student's needs.

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  6. Great point Gail. I was the same way in school. Homework assignments were the worst. I would forget the moment the teacher stopped talking about it and usually that was while I was still in that particular classroom. And as for getting help at home, I had siblings that could help me but did they help me? No. I had to wait until the next school day and by then that lesson was old news. The teacher went on to something else.

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  7. I chose to continue with the training on the ‘flipped classroom’ and participated in the “Flipped Classroom Pathway”. This was a very informative and easy to understand video. It helped me to better understand the ‘why’ and ‘how’ of the flipped classroom. In the tutorial, the author mentions several important points to keep in mind when creating your flipped classroom: student engagement, having clear objectives and purposes, length of video and no interruptions.
    Another important factor to consider is that students should be engaged in learning during the video. It is suggested that a note taking form or a reflection/summary area should be included, a quiz template and a Watch Summary Question (WSQ) reflective piece that students would bring to class for discussion.
    I think the most important aspect of the flipped classroom is making sure that students are actively involved in the learning process.

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    1. Hey Stephanie!

      I couldn't agree more with you about student engagement! Many teachers find it hard to get all students engaged and I feel that a flipped classroom is the best way to do so. And keep the students actively involved is perfect!

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    2. I agree with you guys. I just wished I was exposed to more of these things in my own learning. I love the interaction.

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  8. This is my takeaway for Part II A, Office Hours for Online Facilitators. The webinar addressed the challenges of online facilitation: time consuming, keeping audience engaged, momentum and retention. Depending on the audience, retention maybe the biggest challenge because this part of the flipped classroom you have no control over. I looked through some of the “favorite facilitation tools” websites. Zoom is okay but would prefer Google Hangouts, is easy to access if you already have a google account. I found that Screen-O-Matic is easier to work with than VoiceThread. I also opened and set up an account with Voki, I like this tool the best. I am planning on using Voki as part of my class presentation. I played around with it, used the recording option and it came out pretty good. The only complaint I have is that the free version has limited storage and that is not a problem.

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    1. I also enjoyed working with Voki. The problem for me was that I got caught up trying out the many different configurations for my avatar and wasted about an hour playing around!

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    2. Good point Stephanie,

      Keeping the attention of the students is very difficult. I think part of the secret is trying to stay interesting. Too many teachers allow themselves to become extensions of the textbook and never really do anything different.

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  9. This is my takeaway for Part II B, Converting Face-to-Face to Online: Challenges and Opportunities. Some of the challenges discussed included finding an effective partner that has a clear understanding of the mission and goals of the program as well as your philosophy for the program. I totally agree with this, not everyone is on the same page. Compatibility, expertise and innovation are key factors when creating or developing anything, especially if it will be assessed or evaluated.
    As an effective online facilitator, there are certain factors to consider, such as, knowing when to jump in/knowing how long to wait and keeping the conversation going. Back channeling is very important. When I watched the Office Hours video, the facilitator relied on the chat option when asking the audience a question. Instead of multiple participants pushing the microphone button, the chat box was constantly referred to as a tool to answer questions.

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    1. Hi Stephanie,
      You are right, she did. I have been in many professional webinars when that is the only option for attendees. Then it becomes an added layer for all involved. Presenters often miss questions, attendees repeat questions or points that have been made because they are splitting attention between watching, listening and typing. I prefer using Google Hangouts because it more closely mimics a face to face interaction.

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  10. I agree with Gail that the most important element of the flipped classroom is that the teacher is present when the student is working on the actual work. They have the opportunity - or responsibility to watch the lecture before class and then they can practice what they learn and be guided if necessary with the teacher. As we all know, sitting in a classroom watching a teacher or trainer show us how to do something, it looks easy. The minute we get home or back to the office and try to do it ourselves, it's like 'what did he/she say about ....' and then frustration sets in.

    I hear about that type of scenario all the time with the training that I do. People say it looks easy but know that when they go to do it, it won't be. I plan on offering or requiring those who attend the trainings I offer to first view a few 5 - 6 minute videos so they come in with some sort of understanding of what it is we are doing.

    I think in school, this would be very helpful as well. The teachers can be there while the students are applying what they learned.

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    1. As a teacher I can truly appreciate what you are saying. The difficulty in a conventional course though is when you are running off of a standard syllabus and everyone is suppose to finish at the same place. I guess my best example would be this. I am teaching a hybrid course where students do the majority of their learning online and wed have class in a computer lab. I began the course by, each day, looking at what students were ready to learn. I would then do several 10 minute mini lessons for groups of students based on their current progress. The problem was that I would give the same lesson over and over again over the course of about two weeks. Since this was not a module based course I decided to modify the format. I now do a one 20 minute lesson for the entire class and then allow students to work online while I circulate around the room and answer questions.

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    2. That's interesting, Jason. Are you tracking the students' achievements or performance between the two strategies? It would be interesting to see if they improve. I'm still mulling if the convenience of recording by the source of knowledge (teacher, trainer, etc) is outweighed by the ability for students to access the information via technology.

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    3. Leslie, if I am correct about your statement regarding "recording by the source of knowledge outweighing the ability to access technology", in my experience, especially with the population that I work with, access to technology is a common barrier. This population does not have easy access to a desktop, laptop, iPad or the like. Nor so they possess the knowledge or skill to operate these tools. Excuse me for being so blunt but that is the reality. On the other hand, I do believe it is possible to create an online piece to accompany the face-to-face workshop even if those barriers are still present.

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    4. Stephanie, you have hit on two issues we come across in adult basic ed too. Students need a lot of support even when they do have tools.

      We had a student utilizing a distance learning option with one of our partners. She could access it fine in our program but could nto at home no matter what she did. We asked her to bring in her device (luckily it was portable!) and it turned out her issue was a setting with her antivirus which was being triggered by something in the software she needed to use for the distance learning program. We do not have a help desk. The tech teacher and I put our heads together to resolve the issue. Some students struggle with logging in and remembering passwords or knowing when to enter what. There is always a puzzle to solve!

      What I am pondering is- who is using the technology better for really? I believe it can be for the students when it expands or supports their classroom experiences. But I also have to question if it for the benefit of the teacher? I don't have a sense of how often a video would need to be updated. Or how many videos would be used. Some of my staff is tech savvy, some would need to be trained or to experiment with some of the tools we have learned about recently. Both options take time. Unfortunately, our budget is finite so I have to consider the costs vs the outcomes and how to best implement different options.

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    5. @Leslie--Asking the question, "Who is the tech really helping, the student or the teacher?" is a great focus. In an ideal world it should benefit both, but it can be challenging for the teacher and a huge workload. The common suggestion is to keep the videos brief-3-5 minutes and have them 'micro-focus' on specific topics. This way it is easier to update and/or replace in the future.

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    6. Hi Leslie,

      We are keeping track of the data and hope to have a broader picture at the end of this academic year. Early impression is that has a roughly the same impact for traditional lecture students, but there are cases where students have struggled before and this approach seems to be working.

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    7. @ Dave- Thank you. I have seen that time frame suggested in much you have had us read/view. Its important to remember. In our program, we can have students come in earlier than our instructional time to view the videos. Its finding the time to do any related assignments that may be a challenge.

      @Jason- It will be interesting to see what impact this will have. Do your struggling students have the same academic goals and happen to be struggling with a particular concept or are you speaking of students with significant challenges that are working with modified assignments and expected outcomes?

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  11. I looked at the student collaboration tools and since I will be training adults, I don't see anything that will be a good fit for me.

    However, that being said, I think these tools are a wonderful idea for school age students.

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    1. Interesting point Paula!

      Can you see any use for adult training in cases where everyone comes in with a different level of experience? Some trainees may have expertise in area A while others have knowledge in area B?

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    2. Hi Jason
      Yes that is definitely an area of concern in my training. Some people are more familiar witha computer and the process and others are brand new to the university and have no idea about any of the processes in place. I also find it can be a comfort level issue with computers. Some people dive right in and others are very timid and afraid to do anything in case they crash the system! I train in a developmental database so that is not a valid concern but they are still leery!

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    3. @Paula--That's quite alright Paula. Not every tool is for every setting. Just add it to your 'Digital Toolbox', so you can access or refer to it in the future.

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    4. @Dave, yes I think this class has been a wealth of information, not all of which I need right now, but am happy to have in my digital toolbox!!

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    5. It has been a great wealth of information. I did think at first that one size fits many but now I see as we have progressed through this class that is not true. I am trying to keep notes on some index cards on what I have used. I am running out of user names and passwords for each LOL.

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    6. Sounds interesting Paula! I hope this works out for you.

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    7. We are currently looking for new ways to use technology to train the police officers in the various policies/procedures and for roll call trainings. One benefit for us in flipping the classroom is that the officers can view videos that we create during down time and meet the training requirement. It opens up a world of training opportunities over traditional methods that have been used for decades.

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  12. The flipped classroom is an interesting model. In a previous course I wrote a paper on the subject and one of my focuses was a case study of how a flipped classroom can be used in high school credit recovery. Students found this helpful as the faculty were able to tailor the course of study to the needs of each individual student.

    Another way in which the flipped classroom can be useful is when you have a module based learning environment. Many community and technical colleges which offer remediation courses do so using a module approach. A class may have anywhere from 20-40 students, but each student may need to work on slightly different topics based on their initial placement.

    A few questions which I think are appropriate are the following:

    1) If you were a student in HS or college, how open would you be to a flipped classroom? If you have kids would you want them to be placed into such an environment?

    2.) Outside of an education context (school/college) do you see benefits of this model in workplace training?

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    1. Hi Jason,
      As a parent, I would have enjoyed my children being in a flipped classroom. Being able to integrate more hands on, multi-modality learning makes sense to me.

      Many workplaces would benefit in my opinion. Much time is wasted in meetings taking care of items that could have been resolved in non-meeting time. As demands on workers increase, being able to preserve as much time as possible would be well served by efficiency.

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    2. Hi Jason,
      I sit on the fence with both questions.

      I have two boys. The older boy reminds me of myself when I was younger, I needed to be monitored and so did he. He was the kid that would wait until the last minute to complete his homework. He did grow into a responsible young man but his earlier years made me nervous.
      At the other end of the spectrum is the younger boy, he is highly motivated. He would have no problem with this type of learning.

      As for the workplace, I'm not confident about this either. In a perfect world, where everyone is highly motivated it could work. Speaking for myself, I would appreciate this type of work environment. It would cut down on a lot of unnecessary talking.

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    3. Hi Jason,
      I think I would welcome a flipped classroom once my daughter enters middle school. I know that I would like to see what she is learning and try to help her at home as much as possible so that she is able to apply and analyze the information effectively when she's in the classroom.

      I think using this model at work would actually help departments save time on workplace training. It seems more logical, in my opinion, to watch a video at a time that is convenient for me, and then come together as a group to discuss or apply the concepts learned. It would make for shorter training sessions, which can actually increase motivation to participate in future trainings.

      Luz

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    4. As we know well, students all learn differently and at their own pace. I believe that the flipped classroom model is beneficial to all students and faculty alike. It provides students more self-directed learning, while at the same time, allows faculty to guide students in areas where they need it most.

      Jason – I was very interested in module learning. It is very progressive and I think it fits well in this discussion. I believe that high school students today would benefit greatly from this learning style and actually have a son who struggled all through high school. I wish he had these individualized plans available to him – he would have been a much better student.
      Sharyn

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    5. Hi Jason,
      I am actually going to try to incorporate the flipped classroom training into my training sessions at URI. I think giving users an opportunity to view what we are going to dive into in the class, will help them come into the training session with some sort of idea - maybe even more than that - and help them by not giving them information overload, which in my opinion, severely hinders the transfer of knowledge.

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    6. My son is currently in 10th grade. He has had assignments in math on IXL. For him, he is not a self motivated learner so I am not sure it is a good fit. I don't see or hear of any other subjects using a flipped classroom module or any type of that as of yet, but that could be because he is not doing it. In order for it to work, the kids have to be motivated to get it done. So if they have access to the internet and there are no other barriers other than they don't want to do it, and don't view the material when they are supposed to, there has to be consequences. At least in my son's case. He wont' do it if there is no recourse for not doing it. And if I don't know about it, then I can't help at home to get him to do it. So communication between the teacher and the parents has to be there for situations like this, the unmotivated learner....

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    7. Paula, you mentioned your son and his motivation to complete online work at home, I find that many students are just like your son. I know I was this way when I was in high school...

      I notice that the average high school CP student is not highly motivated (at least in math), therefore homework is not a priority. For this population, a flipped classroom is extremely difficult. For example - I teach 5 CP level classes, I post EVERY homework answer key on my website and at least a third my class has less than 50% average on their homework. How is that possible?

      However, I know that the honors track at our high school is extremely competitive and the students take their workload very serious. I definitely think a flipped classroom would benefit the majority of this population.

      I think it is possible that flipped classrooms will become more popular in the future. I believe many students are still getting used to technology responsibilities. Once "one-to-one" technology becomes the norm, it is likely that flipped classrooms will be more attractive and successful.

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    8. These were great responses guys! I really enjoyed reading them.

      It's amazing how much has changed in just the last 15 years. I often wonder if I went back to high school would I recognize the classroom of today.

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  13. Part II - A
    I'm currently watching the webinar on Office Hours for Online Facilitators and I see a benefit to using Zoom, a free video conferencing platform, instead of Google Hangouts because it allows you to record your meeting. The free version only allows you to meet for 45 minute at a time, yet I think that is more than enough time and forces a group to stay focused on the task at hand. Recording meetings, in my opinion, is very beneficial since it allows others who could not attend an opportunity to catch up.

    Luz

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    1. Hi Luz,
      I like that Zoom allows the meeting to be recorded as well. As you probably have experienced with Kathy's class, sometimes not everyone can stick around for the hangout, or the hangout session was a really good informative one and there was no way to capture to review later. Because of just those two reasons, I think the recording aspect is extremely beneficial! And also, after 45 minutes....who cares any more.... :) That is more than enough time for most meetings of this nature.

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    2. Luz, I was looking at Zoom and Google hangouts too. Google Hangout you can’t invite more than 10 people so that could be a problem depending on class size. Zoom was better because I believe you can have up to 25, and do screen sharing.

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    3. I agree with Luz on the limitations of Google Hangouts. It is nice for small group work meetings but it is difficult to do other things with. I believe that you can record a Google hangout but only if you live stream to youtube. I might be wrong on this.

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    4. I'm thinking Zoom may be the best option due to the expanded class size availability. Google Hangouts have been great for our small group of four to discuss class and the content we are reviewing, but it can get problematic when you try to conduct an entire class within the software.

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  14. Hi Everyone,
    I watched the Office Hours webinar. In the adult basic ed world, some of our students work multiple jobs which results in limited time for homework and meeting hours. We have tried many models for advising but keep coming back to pulling them from class for at least their initial session. Being able to develop a series of advising sessions online has potential.

    We also have a number of students who do not have computer and/or internet access. We have subscribed ot a number of tools including HiSET Academy and IXL (for Math) which the students who can access them, love them and their skills benefit from the reinforcement. Those who cannot access them get left further behind.

    The tools offered are helpful as long as they can be accessed by the students and there is some level of interaction once the sessions are viewed.

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  16. I took a look at the collaboration tools and found the baiboard to be very interesting. It is an app that works with iPads. You can link multiple iPads together and work on the same project. Whats really cool is you can not only import a document to work on but you also have the ability to draw on your project. The only draw back is that the people collaborating all have to have iPads.
    We used google hangouts weekly in Kathy Pinos classes so I have become comfortable with this app. I have also started using this app with people on my board to collaborate in projects because I have team members that live more than an hour away. Its nice because it works with any kind of phone. Unlike FaceTime that you have to have an apple device and I believe you can only talk to one person at a time. The only drawback that I have found with hangouts is that I have to have the app open to receive people adding me to a group.
    Looking at this list, I was also thinking that social media is also a great tool for collaboration. I use it for my softball team. We have a Facebook group that we communicate thru. Because it’s a closed group no one else can see our comments. We have conversations but also send each other pics and information on upcoming tournaments and uniform ideas. I also like that it shows you who has seen what has been posted, so you know who is in the loop even if they don’t comment. And there is a great amount of control over the alerts you get.

    -tai

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    1. Hi Tai,
      I agree that Hangouts have been great for those of us collaborating on a project. Another benefit to having the availability of the program on multiple devices is it give you an option in case of internet connectivity issues. I had wifi go down, so my laptop was essentially useless. With Hangout on my cell phone, I was able to use the cellular data connection to rejoin the group without any issues - very handy!

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  17. So I did the flipped classroom continuation and learned so much. I loved how they told you to have a personality and no be a robot. I feel that some teachers don't put enough of themselves into their lessons and just read verbatim from the slides and don't sounds enthused about their lesson. They just can't find a way to connect with their students. This also helps bring evhnology into the classroom which some teachers find hard to do especially when they've been teacheing for so long and may be used to what they've been doing for however many years. I also loved how many ways their were to create different flipped classroom lessons, like iPad apps, screencasts, videos, audio... etc.

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  18. Now I have a little different perspective. Today, I co-taught a classroom of 28 third graders. Their abilities, level of engagement and willingness to cooperate were all over the map. What we found worked best was a divide and conquer by grouping what we determined were like ability children for each task. Working with the smaller, more homogenic groups allowed us to work through tasks with more integrity than trying to do large group instruction. It would be helpful, in that model, to have flipped classroom materials to expand the learning of the able and willing by challenging them and engaging them especially when they are able to work independently.

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    1. Leslie in your view do you think flipping the classroom is good at any age level?

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    2. Well Heidi, I think it has merits and would probably work better for students in middle or high school.

      For our adult learners working on basic skills, I would support any staff member who wants to try it but would really have to be convinced that all student could participate (have technology/time) and would choose to. We assign homework for those who want to work more aggressively towards their goals but cannot penalize those who cannot get it done regardless of reason. We have a number of software products that students can use to enhance their skills currently. Very few are successful with using them with any integrity outside of our program hours. They have best intentions but reality is different.

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  19. II A:
    I watched the Office Hours for Online Facilitators webinar. I found it interesting that as with a FTF classroom, the main concern this presentation discussed is audience engagement. They suggest implementing some facilitation tools to keep the attention focused on the lesson. While investigating these tools, I found that I liked the platform of the Screen-O-Matic. It is very user friendly. I also tried Voki and I think it was easier to use than other apps like this – it is more appropriate for education and would make a great ice breaker option.
    II B:
    This section addresses something everyone needs to take into consideration when teaching; in a FTF setting, but especially in a flipped class. Selecting a counterpart to work with who understands your mission can make or break the lesson. You need to find someone who agrees with the mission and philosophy and can deliver what is necessary for the outcomes of the curriculum to be achieved. I think that watching the video shed light on the importance of knowing exactly how you want all involved to share in discussions, answer and/or ask questions ahead of time to ensure the session flows cohesively.
    Sharyn

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  20. IIA - after watching the webinar I believe that zoom is an awesome way to hold meetings and even discussions on or even have groups form discussions record them and allow the teacher to view them for grading and. Assessment. I definitely see the benefits from this

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  21. IIB-
    As teachers we need to communicate exactly what we want and how we want it done. We also need to find people who agree with our ideas and can help bring them to life. Our lessons are what we make them

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  22. I continued with flipping the classroom (sorry I was little behind). I like the endless variety of ways to effectively teach using this format. I like the online quizzes you can produce and the interactive ways students can learn. These varies approaches help keep students interested. I have been looking at implementing podcasts and videos. In using podcasts it is still recommended to keep them short. I have been playing with some Google Apps for Education because it has unlimited storage. YouTube is good and easy to use to add. I like that you can then incorporate other methods to interact with video like questions and forms that are fun to make sure that students watched the video. This is an endless learning project and I feel that if you don’t stay up on this stuff you will quickly fall through the cracks.

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    1. Hi Heidi - I agree. As someone who did not utilize the tools that Google has to offer, I am quickly becoming a fan!! They are very practical and easy to use - I am imagining a whole variety of ways I can incorporate them.

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    2. It was great to get together and meet yesterday to go over some of the tools together. So many avenues that we can use. Endless!

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    3. I totally agree, I love google anything. The first time I tried it was for a group project. It was totally new to me but once I got over the initial fear, I liked it. Again, the best part for me is the automatic save feature.
      Before a few weeks ago, I had no reason to venture beyond google docs but I'm glad I did. There is so much that can be done using google anything.
      I did have a mishap downloading a YouTube video tutorial to my personal laptop for a presentation that I am working on. I had no problems downloading it at school but whatever it was that came with the video wiped out my ability to connect to the internet even though my connectivity was at 100%. Thank you to the IT women that fixed that problem. That is my biggest concern with downloading all of these different types of websites.

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    4. That is a valid concern, Stephanie. Think of how much we rely on our computers and connectivity. It would be crippling to have that happen.

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  23. II B:
    I think it is great that the presenters of this webinar saw the need for an online course and that they actually developed one to be able "cast their net farther". I also agree with what many of you have stated; it is important to find a partner who understands the material, goals, and objectives when transitioning from f-2-f to online. I think that it is important to understand and recognize one's weaknesses in order to accept the help and expertise of others. These presenters knew what they were good at and what they weren't and used each others skills to their advantage.
    Luz

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  24. I found these webinars to be enlightening, I have done a decent amount of research on flipped classrooms yet I learned so much from these presenters. Also, I enjoyed reading everyone responses. Someday I would like to try "flipping" my class and it is nice to know how others feel about this concept.

    There were many comments regarding a partner that has the same mission. Working with someone who has the same philosophies always make a project smoother. Additionally, using each other's skills to complete the mission is a great idea. I hope someday soon I can put these ideas to good use.
    -Jen

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