Thursday, November 3, 2016

Session 9

Good afternoon,

During Week 9 we will be attending a film/media/video creation talk (details below) and then pulling out as a smaller group to discuss topics pertinent to our group specifically. This workshop is particularly poignant b/c of the timing w/i our curriculum discussing and learning about video production and its uses and impact w/i a flipped classroom.

Hope to see as many of you as possible.

Thursday, November 03, 2016
4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
URI, Kingston campus - Gender and Sexuality Center 19 Upper College Rd (All Purpose RM)
Series: Media Smart Libraries

Speaker(s): Sherilyn Brown, Director of Education Programs, RI State Council on the Arts
The GiveMe5 Media Teachers Lab is a time for film/media educators, school and public librarians, and others developing video programs to come together and share ideas, challenges and solutions with colleagues. Whether you're experienced, new to the work, or somewhere in between, the "open space" style of this event makes a place for you. In the "open space" format, each facilitator will each spend a few minutes describing their areas of expertise and related topics, and you will then be free to join the discussion(s) you feel will be most helpful for you. You may move among discussions.
Topics are expected to include (but are not limited to):
  1. creating or revising curriculum; gaining expertise in editing
  2. buying and using basic equipment; exploring possibilities with high-end equipment
  3. learning to use a new online film education resource
  4. making a case for a media education program.
If you are inspired to facilitate a discussion on your own topic, "open space" allows for that as well.
Our facilitators and key focus areas for this event:
  • Katie Reaves, Film teacher, Beacon High School School for the Arts, Woonsocket Building a program and equipment on a budget and short timeline, "It's about thinking like a filmmaker!"
  • Brien Jennings, Library Media Specialist, Narragansett Elementary School Connecting curriculum to film at the elementary level (including equipment, roles of a library media specialist, making the case for a program, media literacy)
  • Dana Neugent, Information Technology Services, University of Rhode Island Touring studio facilities and viewing student work
  • Nick Marcoux, Film teacher (middle and high school), Trinity Academy for the Performing Arts, Building a curriculum sequence from middle to high school (including equipment and evolving editing choices)
  • Anisa Raoof, Providence Children's Film Festival, Film Hub Connecting educators and the community to film through a new website.

33 comments:

  1. Hi Professor, I'm bummed out that I missed the presentation but more so that I missed a class discussion. For those that were unable to make it to Kingston will you give an overview of what you discussed in the class?

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    1. Hi Stephanie,

      Christine gave a solid synopsis below, but I would be happy to answer any other questions.

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  2. Thank you Stephanie, I would appreciate that, as well.

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  3. Hi Stephanie, I was able to go to the class portion on Wednesday night and will be happy to share my take away. It was really nice to meet f2f to not only get to know each other but to go over our ideas for the final project. Dave gave us the overview, which is here: #4 - Final Project -Create a discipline specific Professional Development/Training or other classroom session that integrates as many of the tools from this course as possible. Instruction regarding this project will be incorporated into each weekly session resulting in the final unit of instruction utilizing tools learned. Short oral presentation (5-7 minutes). It should address how you plan to use these tools, or actually be a snapshot of an actual lesson that you have created using tools and resources discovered from the content learned across the semester. - Presented in person on Dec. 10th.(??Saturday??)
    Students present: Jen B; Winnie N. Laura; Jason S. and myself.
    We went around the table and gave a short synopsis of what we thought we would do. Pretty much what we put into our deliverables 1 and 2 so far. Basically Dave wants us to make it something that will be useful and meaningful to us “someday” My situation is all made up, I will be creating a blog for developmental networking in a university setting but Jen was thinking of creating an educational wiki that she could share with other teachers so that they could learn, collaborate and build off of each others videos and educational tools. Many hours go into creating and researching these videos so why not share them with other educators. Winnie will be developing a training resource which will help faculty learn about research grant writing and hopefully minimize the need for one on one training. Jason is creating a cool tool to help his students with math, Jason can elaborate. All I know is I wish I had Jason ideas around when I was learning math. Lastly, Laura has a neat idea for an interactive video for physical fitness that will use cool prezi features, stop along the way for questions and then continue on. Great ideas all around. In terms of the final presentation class, we discussed the need to have a backup plan if technology failed. Bring your presentation on a flash drive or if email works, have it in google slides so you can access it easily and if that fails, it’s all you in front of all of us. We are nearing the final countdown. We can do this!! I am learning so much and know that I will use many of these tools even if it is just to impress my kids. Thanks for taking the time with us Dave, much appreciated. Dave please clear up one thing, on the syllabus, it says the final presentations will be December 10 which is a Saturday, did you mean December 8th, the THURSDAY?

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    1. Thank you, Chris. This is very helpful since I was at work and not able to participate. DO you know if the presentation was recorded so we could view it?

      The 10th would work better for me as I always work on Tuesday/Thursday evenings. The 8th is possible but it means I am not on site for our students.

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    2. Thanks for the update, Chris! So are we supposed to prepare a power point presentation on what we plan to create or actually create it and present it (a blog, in my case) to the class? Or either of the two? Just a little confused....
      Luz

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    3. Hi Luz, I think we are to make and give a presentation (any format we choose, i.e. prezi, movenote, adobe spark, power point,f2f live...) about our training session, in our case a blog.

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    4. Thanks for the information, Chris! This semester is flying by!

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    5. Clarification--@Christine--Yes, we will be meeting f2f on Dec. 8th, Thursday night from 4-6:45. Location is tbd. I want to reserve a computer lab/classroom to aid in your Final Presentation delivery.
      @Stephanie--no there wasn't a recording of the presentation, nor of the class discussion, but Christine gives a nice summary.
      @Luz-Your Final Presentation can be through any medium of your choice. Some are using PowerPoint, Prezi, YouTube, Wiki demo... The choice is yours, but the expectation is that you will create something pragmatic and real. You'll give the class a brief presentation on what you have created/envision and then demonstrate what you have created either in full or just an overview.

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    6. Thank you for the clarification, Dave.
      Luz

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  4. Help, am I missing something here. Was the Kingston presentation and mini class this week's assignment or am I looking in the wrong place? I'm following the syllabus for the readings but is that all?

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    1. The Kingston presentation and mini-class was this week's session. Please read the additional readings on the syllabus for Week 9 and continue with any discussions on the Flipped Classroom.

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    2. @Dave,
      Thank you for the step-by-step article "How to "Flip This Lesson" Using YouTube and Ted Ed". Not having hands on experience as a teacher, this helped me to understand the process of flipping a classroom a little more. I enjoy watching TED Talks but haven't really delved into TED Ed prior to this class. I am curious to find tools that could help our staff.

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  5. Thanks Chris - very helpful information. Sounds like the presentations will be very informative - can't wait!!

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  6. Yes Christine, Thanks for this information! Does anyone know if there is a topic for this week? I am not sure what we are supposed to be discussing.

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  7. Actually nevermind, I just read the syllabus and it looks like we are continuing with the flipped classroom. I am very interested in this and am planning on trying it for the training that I do at URI. It will be very helpful to have people already have an idea of what I am going to go over before the class begins!

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    1. Sounds like a good way to 'break the ice', Paula. Will you be piloting this soon, and what tools will you use to aid you?

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    2. Hi Dave, I usually hold training sessions about every other month unless requested to do more. So I'd like to create some videos using Camtasia before I hold my next round of trainings and try it out then. I am really am hopeful that it will help the employees understand and grasp the new knowledge faster if they have a preview of what it is all about!

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  8. I really enjoyed the Students as Contributors: The Digital Learning Farm article. It was something we all knew, but was nice to read the cyclical evolution of how we have needed our children for the progression of our communities.

    I commend the authors for the revolutionary way they are allowing the students to problem solve in their own ways. I checked out some of the YouTube videos and it is so nice to see the rewards of their hard work in person.

    I’m glad to see that they are ensuring that the students find safe, ethical ways in which to incorporate these skills into the classroom which will lead to them becoming important, integral members of society.

    Sharyn

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    1. Hi Sharyn,
      I also enjoyed that article. There were a number of points that jumped out at me- first was the transition of the role of children as our nation transitioned to a knowledge based economy. When we were farmers, all hands were needed. Jobs were assigned based on the child's ability. Everyone in the family collaborated to make the farm successful. It's actually sad to me that not all families collaborate as deeply now. I also feel that we, as a society, have lost sight of civic engagement both from teaching understanding of the role of the individual as a needed contributor and for helping people understand the impact of their one vote making a difference in our democratic system.

      The next concept that stood out was the creativity in which critical thinking is taught. In my adult basic skills world, we struggle with some learners who are passive. It's as if they think sitting within the four walls will suffice in the appropriate knowledge and skills being deposited into their bodies to be output at some time later in life. Our role is to find a way to ignite their learning desire. Since traditional chalk and talk did not work in the past, being able to incorporate some of these methods expands the teachers' toolbox. That is cool!

      Lastly, Kiva is an awesome organization which my family has supported for years. I never thought to utilize it as a teaching tool. What a win-win! We have 7 hrs a week with busy adult learners to teach them to high school level mastery in Math, Science, Reading, Writing and Social Studies. Kiva micro-lending could span all content areas giving rich lesson opportunities in each. The recipients of the loans benefit too! Our students, although they face many challenges day-to-day, are also some of the most generous people we have ever met. It would be exciting to empower them by having the experience of how micro-lending can be life changing.

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    2. Thanks Leslie. Glad you made the connection!!

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    3. Sharyn,
      I was also impressed by the way the authors created interesting and contemporary ways for students to use this new technology. We must keep students engaged!

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  9. Good morning All,
    In regards to the article "Flipped Learning: A Response To Five Common Criticisms", the authors captured many of the responses I have heard when I mentioned flipped classrooms (FC). We are learning that the definition of FC moves well beyond "videos being watched at home and homework being done at school" but the process is still daunting to me.

    When we discuss curriculum planning, one key component is the "essential question" which will drive the FC method also. The teachers who can "figure out what the right questions are to ask when students come to class" will have a much richer class time experience because the students will be immediately engaged.

    Although I agreed with the authors' explanations most of the time, I did take umbrage at their suppositions about students who do not do homework. In our adult basic ed world, students are juggling many roles and responsibilities. Some have home lives that are chaotic and in turmoil. Some are working extremely long hours to make ends meet. Some are parents and workers so they are juggling both often times putting their children and work demands before their own needs or desire for knowledge. The reasons for not doing homework go well beyond a lack of device or internet access. I would like to see staff experiment with FC but we will have to think very deliberately about implementation so that all students can be successful.

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    1. Leslie,
      Based on what I have read so far, it seems as though flipping a unit, or even just a class to start, would be a way to begin. It was mentioned that there could be a library of sorts, something comparable to ta test bank, for videos, so that you don't have to keep making your own. There was a comment made regarding copyright information, so that issue would have to be addressed. It makes me laugh when I read comments from people saying a FC is less work for the teacher!! Thankfully, educators are always trying to improve learning methods for their students.

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    2. The lack of time and resources for our adult learners to do homework also worries me, Leslie. I agreed with many of the criticisms cited in the article, but my main take away is that flipped classrooms can help students become self-directed learners, but I believe they must develop the self efficacy to do so, first. It's never easy to return to school after an extended absence, and it is especially hard if one is introduced to a "new" way of learning, like a flipped classroom. Maybe we can (virtually) hand hold them until they get the hang of it? ;P
      Luz

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    3. I forget which article I saw this, or what video, but there is a 'bank' of videos that teachers can choose from. I think it may have been in Sophia tutorials. I think that would be a great resource for teachers to be able to share videos because I agree, that's a lot of up front work!

      My views regarding students not doing the work are pretty much on the same page as all of you. We have to be cognizant of the barriers and issues they may face at home. Not everyone has a lot of time and if an adult is attempting to come back to school, as an educator, it is our responsibility to help them learn how to manage as best we can. A little criticism can go a long way to hurting one's efficacy so we need to be encouraging and helpful as they find their way.

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  10. Leslie, I too feel that it can be daunting as a teacher to set up a curriculum that will keep it's students engaged and also cover all the relevant information. Having spoken with other teachers recently, I realize they have all they can do to get the things done such as grading papers, creating tests and researching best practices, let alone try and create useful videos. It's one thing if you are able to take baby steps and maybe do one class at a time and build upon it over several years. This way you don't feel overwhelmed with the new work load and the kids don't feel like they are getting more homework dumped on them. Some kids may feel like watching the video at home is more homework. To touch on the points you make about the barriers we all face, I totally agree. I can't imagine doing all of this without the tools and technology piece being readily available to me.

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  11. I found the article, Students as Contributors: The Digital Learning Farm, to be exciting and refreshing. In order to engage our students, we need to find teaching methods that will be of interest to them. Most of the students I have taught would enjoy contributing to the class as a tutorial designer or an official scribe. Taking notes for each other is helpful to the note taker, as well as to the people who are reading the notes. This is a good example of finding a way for the students to assist each other, but continuing to learn themselves.

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  12. Greetings from Ireland everyone! So I was able to attend the talk and everyone had great things to show us all and I would love to incorporate many of the things I learned to some of my lessons! I was able to sit with nick marcoux! He was very intelligent and able to answer all questions my group had. Though much of it was new information to me he discussed great ways to get everyone involved and to help give credit to all students, they could do so by not only working on their own videos but also being a part of someone else's and ending up in the credits. There were also many ideas for small projects that were easy to start students on editing like the 5 second count down which allows them to be really creative!
    I also enjoyed meeting some of our classmates and discussing our final projects, hearing whatbtheir ideas were through their experience in the working was beneficial to me who is not as experienced so thank you to all who came for your wonderful ideas!

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  13. Hi All, a little late with week 9 post. Again, I'm on the fence with the FC idea. My issue stems from, especially with middle and high school, students pacing themselves. I was one of those students. My high school graduation requirements were similar to college, each class was worth one credit, five credits per year equals 20 credits to graduate. I was one of those students that needed to be monitored so that type of learning did not work for me. Of course, there are some students that are high achievers and can handle this type of teaching. For example, out of one hundred students is it safe to say that more than half will have the capability to actually keep up or more importantly have time at home to complete assignments. As one of my classmate mentioned earlier we have to be mindful of out of school time availability of students. In some cases being in school is the only time they have to themselves.

    Another issue that concerns me is the, "Official Scribes", mentioned in the Digital Learning Farm article. On a daily basis students are assigned to take notes for that day for the entire class. I think that is too much pressure on a student. As an adult, I would have a problem understanding and relying on someone else's notes.

    As Luz and Paula mentioned earlier, returning back to school after a long absence is difficult and a little hand holding can make the difference. I returned back to school after a thirty year absence to a culture that I knew nothing about. I was anxious but determined, however, if I had received a grade lower than a B- I would not have returned the next semester.

    I feel as though I am always bashing online learning. The problem I have with it only concerns middle and high school students. For the most part, I am trying to bring myself to a point where I am able to use online technology as fluently as my counterparts, but it is hard. I miss the paper and pencil era. As I have mentioned in earlier posts I like to hold what I'm reading in my hands, whether its a book, a piece of paper or a sticky note.

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  14. I'm going to do my presentation about Babies for Us (of course). I've been doing a lot of presentations lately and only have a limited amount of time. I've been working on a prezi to explain what it is and what we do. I also would like to do a poll during my presentation and one other technological device.

    -tai

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