Thursday, December 1, 2016

525-Session 12--Open Education Resources aka: "OER's"


Welcome to Session 12


course image
We will begin this section on OER's with more detail and some practice exercises with Creative Commons Licensing, but first let's hear from David Wiley.  David and I worked together on an OER course waaaaaay back in 2008.  We were sponsored by the Hearst Foundation and Curriki.  Let's listen to David's introduction on "Open Education and the Future."




Now, you've heard me reference CC Licensing throughout the semester, but we haven't really had any practical application or experiences with it, so I thought that we would practice with some hands-on work.

This 'challenge' will familiarize you with the range of Creative Commons licenses which grant permission to the world to use creative work in specific ways. It also will get you started on the road to being "CC savvy" with a few short videos and activities, and we will end this week with you making a video of your own.

As you go through all four tasks in this module, called, "Get CC Savy" I want you to think about the following questions and respond in your comments this week:

First, decide what license you think the creator in each scenario would choose. Then go to the Creative Commons license chooser tool and answer the questions like you were the creator.
  1. You are a relatively obscure musician who wants as many people to discover your music as possible, but also wants to be able to reserve the commercial right to sell your work. Which license(s) might you choose?
  2. You are an elementary school teacher who has created a great resource on how the solar system works, and want other teachers to benefit. Which license(s) would you choose?
  3. You are an amateur photographer who has taken photos of landmarks in your area and want them to be featured in their Wikipedia articles. Which license(s) do you choose?

In each case, was the license choosen result the same license you chose? If not, what do you think happened that led to the discrepancy? Did you choose different licenses depending on the type of creator? If so, why? What was different?


These questions can only be answered as you go through the module.  In addition to these questions, I'd like you to do one more exercise when you get to part 4 of the module.

I'd like you to videotape yourself (you can use a cellphone camera, nothing fancy) completing the exercise in part 4.  Then upload it to YouTube, make it shareable, and paste the link in your comments for this week.

Please return to this blog and post your information in the comments (due by Mon., 12/5) before moving on to the second-half of this week's work below.

The second-half of this week's session will be an extension of the content that we covered above.  In Part 1 we will build upon our foundational knowledge of OER's and learn how to find and recognize open content on the web.

Part 1


This challenge will help you learn how to find and recognize open content, such as public domain and Creative Commons licensed videos, images, and websites, in the 'wild'. You'll get acquainted with valuable collections of open content and discover new ways to find them. 

There are three elements within Part 1 of S12. 
  1. Choosing a topic or question to focus on, (Try to choose something 'pragmatic' for your present or future work-setting.)
  2. Finding your resources for #1, and 
  3. Posting links to the results of your search.
You may find the exercises for Part 1 "Teach Someone Something with Open Content"  here.  

Part 2

In part 2 of S12 we will learn how to assemble, adapt, and share open content on the web.   This challenge will help you pull together the open content you found on the web in Part 1 and figure out how to properly attribute and mark what you're using.


There are four segments to Part 2.  (Throughout Part 2, try to choose something 'pragmatic' for your present or future work-setting.)

  1. Organize your resources,
  2. Edit the resources,
  3. Attribute the original creators,
  4. Teach it.
# 4-Teach it--- will have much more depth than the small video exercise that we did in the first-half of this week's session, so this may serve in place of either your Deliverable #2 (if you haven't done it yet) or Deliverable #3.  You may choose.

Please videotape and post to YouTube the "Teach It" assignment described in #4 or you may use a Screencasting tool of your choice.  We've reviewed a number of resources to use this semester, but here is a link to some of them again.  Then post a link to it w/i your session comments.

You may access the work for Part 2 here.  

Next week  we won't be having class.  This means that you have two weeks (Dec. 15th) to complete this assignment, but please note the due date for Part 1 above.

I will probably post a 'voluntary' S13 that will be significantly less than previous weeks, so you may use most of your extra time to prepare your Final Presentation that you will be giving the class on Dec. 15th.  We will be meeting in the Shepard Building in a computer lab.  The exact room is tbd.

Here is a description copied from the syllabus:

Final Project -Create a discipline specific Professional Development/Training or other classroom session that integrates as many of the tools from this course as possible.  Instruction regarding this project will be incorporated into each weekly session resulting in the final unit of instruction utilizing tools learned. Short oral presentation (5-7 minutes).  It should address how you plan to use these tools, or actually be a snapshot of an actual lesson that you have created using tools and resources discovered from the content learned across the semester.- Presented 'in-person' on Dec. 15th.


I try to keep the options open for practicality.  The spectrum of backgrounds and careers of your peers leads me to want to give you the flexibility to either create a PD presentation using some of the tools you've been exposed to, or you may present to the class a hypothetical scenario for your future that discusses how you 'may' do the first choice some day.

I have said repeatedly throughout the semester that we should 'let practicality prevail over all else.'  Continuing with this philosophy if you can think of a way to adapt the Final Project to make it more 'practical' for you in your present day setting (or a setting you anticipate for your future) then send me an email with the details and specifics of your 'amendment'.  I nearly always approve of them b/c I want you to create a teaching unit that you will find holds value for you.

Please feel free to contact me if you have further questions!

Good Luck and have fun.

PS-Paul has been ill, so please wish him good health.



96 comments:

  1. 1. A In Creative Commons I would choose the following: 1B (to follow on videotape)

    1.-Musician; I would chose “no” as I would want the protection not to share is commercially but would want as many people to share it.

    2-Teacher; I would choose “yes” as it would be ok to copy, distribute, display and make distribute derivatives of it works as needed.

    3-Photo-I would chose “yes, as long as others share alike” as I would want to share it but also be protective.

    I chose these licenses because of the type of creation it was and what the person indicated what they wanted to do. These licenses help the creator to control distribution of their work and no one else can necessarily profit from it as it is protected. This site allows many forms of creativity to the public for sharing, repurposing and having copy right protection. This is important especially with the amount of media and technology that is used today; many which we learned from in this class.

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  3. 1. You are a relatively obscure musician who wants as many people to discover your music as possible, but also wants to be able to reserve the commercial right to sell your work. Which license(s) might you choose?

    Attribution-Non-commercial-Share alike-4.0 International

    2. You are an elementary school teacher who has created a great resource on how the solar system works, and want other teachers to benefit. Which license(s) would you choose?

    Attribution- 4.0 International

    3. You are an amateur photographer who has taken photos of landmarks in your area and want them to be featured in their Wikipedia articles. Which license(s) do you choose?

    Attribution-Share alike-4.0 International


    In each case, was the license chosen result the same license you chose? If not, what do you think happened that led to the discrepancy? Did you choose different licenses depending on the type of creator? If so, why? What was different?

    I did not find a key or answers to these questions in the four modules, and so I could not compare my answers to see if they are different from the license chosen. If someone else did, please point me in the right direction!

    I did choose a different license depending on the type of creator. I based my choices on the short explanations provided in the CC licensing tool.

    For example, the amateur photographer would like to have his work featured in Wikipedia articles, so he cannot have a non-commercial or non-derivative CC if he wants them used on this platform. But, I chose a ‘Share alike’ CC so that it is copied or shared under similar licenses.

    I chose a non-commercial-share alike license for the musician because it allows other people to use his work non-commercially, and the 'share alike' attribute would require that it is copied an shared under similar licenses.

    Finally, I chose the Attribution 4.0 International for the school teacher because this allows anyone to copy, distribute, duplicate, and build upon the resource. Since it is not a form of art but a resource for teaching, I did not put a restriction on commercial use.

    I would really like to know the correct answers to the questions, so if anyone found them, please share! Thanks :)

    Luz

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  4. Well this is interesting to read others answers. The licenses I ended up with were:
    1. Musician: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
    2. Teacher: Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International
    3. Photographer: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

    Luz, I was unsure as well since I could not find an answer key. As you both stated, my choices were based on the intent of the creator. We agree on the first two scenarios. For the third, I felt the photographer had a very prescribed intent that was curatorial so he may not want his work ever altered so that is why I chose the noderiviative option.

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    1. Interesting indeed, Leslie. My decision for the photographer was based on an explanation provided on the CC licensing tool:

      "A real world example of license incompatibility: Works with the NonCommercial or the NoDerivatives restriction may not be posted to Wikipedia".

      Maybe I'm interpreting it wrong though?

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    2. Here is what I came up with:
      You are a relatively obscure musician who wants as many people to discover your music as possible, but also wants to be able to reserve the commercial right to sell your work. Which license(s) might you choose?
      For this I chose Attribution-Non Commercial - No Derivatives - 4.0. I chose this because he wants to expose people to his work but also reserve the right to sell it.
      You are an elementary school teacher who has created a great resource on how the solar system works, and want other teachers to benefit. Which license(s) would you choose?
      For this I chose Attribution-No Derivatives 4. 0 International. I chose this because she wants to share her work, and wants others to use it but I don't think she wants them to make changes to it. I could be way off here.
      You are an amateur photographer who has taken photos of landmarks in your area and want them to be featured in their Wikipedia articles. Which license(s) do you choose?

      For this scenario I chose Attribution - Non Commercial - Share Alike 4.0. It's Wikipedia and the way I think about Wikipedia is that if you post something on there, you are basically allowing others to use it, edit it or do whatever they want with whatever you post.

      I could be waaayy off on this stuff. I know it's important, but my eyes gloss over the minute I start reading this stuff. I guess it's a good thing (and good reason) why I am not a corporate lawyer!!!

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    3. It's so funny how we all came up with different licenses!

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    4. It is! As I am reading everyones I am saying oh that one is correct, then the next one oh I get it that one is correct

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    5. Hi Ladies, there was no answer key, I think we could use the cc calculator which was somewhat hidden in the cc webpage off to the side. I did find the calculator limiting though. You could not put in all your criteria, just minimal info. I hope this helps. It took me quiet some time to find it. :)

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    6. Wow, I guess it really is all about the interpretation!!

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  5. Good catch, I missed that detail :-p

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  6. 1. Musician: For this option, I chose the CC BY NC ND as it was very restrictive. It appeared that the gentlemen did not want people to gain from or use his work but wanted them to watch or listen to it only . This choice matched what the cc calculator chose.
    2. Teacher: I chose CC By (see below) as it stated it was the most accommodating and good for maximum dissemination, however, when I re-thought it, teachers may not want to share commercially so I agree with the calculators BY-NC choice.
    Attribution
    CC BY:This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.
    The CC calculator chose: BY NC
    3. Photographer: For this one, I thought it should be CC BY-SA but the calculator chose CC BY
    I found this task a bit confusing and found myself second guessing as in CC Q & A section, they had differing explanations for the licenses. It did say that one should consult legal council when choosing a license also so it is not as easy as it seems especially if you absolutely want all rights reserved.

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  7. I purposely choose to answer my questions prior to looking at anyone else's and am amazed at how different the perspectives are. As I said previously, it is not easy to choose the license and would recommend consulting a lawyer or someone who is totally knowledgeable in CC licensing before setting your own up.

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  8. Here is a link to my video for exercise 4, discussions regarding Creative Commons. https://spark.adobe.com/video/ifeMEgFRVEdBm.

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    1. Chris,
      GREAT job!! I love Adobe spark!

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    2. Nice job as always, Chris!

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    3. Great job. You always make this stuff look so easy.

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  9. Here is what I came up with:
    You are a relatively obscure musician who wants as many people to discover your music as possible, but also wants to be able to reserve the commercial right to sell your work. Which license(s) might you choose?
    For this I chose Attribution-Non Commercial - No Derivatives - 4.0. I chose this because he wants to expose people to his work but also reserve the right to sell it.
    You are an elementary school teacher who has created a great resource on how the solar system works, and want other teachers to benefit. Which license(s) would you choose?
    For this I chose Attribution-No Derivatives 4. 0 International. I chose this because she wants to share her work, and wants others to use it but I don't think she wants them to make changes to it. I could be way off here.
    You are an amateur photographer who has taken photos of landmarks in your area and want them to be featured in their Wikipedia articles. Which license(s) do you choose?

    For this scenario I chose Attribution - Non Commercial - Share Alike 4.0. It's Wikipedia and the way I think about Wikipedia is that if you post something on there, you are basically allowing others to use it, edit it or do whatever they want with whatever you post.

    I could be waaayy off on this stuff. I know it's important, but my eyes gloss over the minute I start reading this stuff. I guess it's a good thing (and good reason) why I am not a corporate lawyer!!!

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  11. 1. You are a relatively obscure musician who wants as many people to discover your music as possible, but also wants to be able to reserve the commercial right to sell your work. Which license(s) might you choose?
    The licenses I choose for this question were Attribution and Non- commercial, and Share Alike. The musician wants as many people to see and share his/her work, but wants to retain the ability to be credited for the work; as well as having the ability to sell the work.
    2. You are an elementary school teacher who has created a great resource on how the solar system works, and want other teachers to benefit. Which license(s) would you choose?
    I would choose Attribution and Share Alike licenses for this question. As stated in the licensing video assigned for this session; we all need to share our work with our students and with other educators. That is part of the magic of technology!
    3. You are an amateur photographer who has taken photos of landmarks in your area and want them to be featured in their Wikipedia articles. Which license(s) do you choose?
    For question #3, I picked Attribution.
    I could not find the answer key, either; did anyone ever find it?
    I like the idea of Creative Commons; it is more specific, and everyone knows upfront what is allowed and what is not.

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  12. Hi Everyone!
    Here is my brief explanation on CC:

    https://youtu.be/s_u7VsY4kfc

    Luz

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    1. I forgot to add that my husband didn't really have any questions about creative commons. He thought it was neat that "formal" permission doesn't have to be asked for like when trying to use something that is Copy written. He is all about sharing information and if "people can make a guide better, then go for it!"

      Luz

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    2. Nicely done, Luz (and Albert!)

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    3. Nice job. Again, simply done and to the point. I've been working on mine since yesterday morning and I keep erasing it because I'm trying to make it into something that it doesn't need to be, difficult.

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  13. Great video Luz, I like how you took a different approach to the video with the camera on the pad for demonstration rather than on yourself. I myself do not like to see myself on camera. Great option. Thanks for being different.

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  15. Great video Luz, I like how you took a different approach to the video with the camera on the pad for demonstration rather than on yourself. I myself do not like to see myself on camera. Great option. Thanks for being different.

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  16. Like Chris, I do not like to be on camera although I am sporting a "I support the right to bear knowledge" shirt right now! Here is my YouTube video: https://youtu.be/M1hzBlcJZfA

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  18. Replies
    1. Good evening everyone!! Please note that my 2nd slide repeats the audio from slide 1 before it begins the correct audio. I attempted numerous times to correct this; to no avail. My apologies!! You know me and technology!!!

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    2. Hi Gail,
      I really like the graphic you chose explaining the CC Licenses. It was brief and easy to read. Nice work on the video!

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  19. Here is what I have...

    1. The musician - Attribution-Non-Commercial NoDervis
    - As a musician, I would want as many people as possible to discover/hear my music but I would not want anyone to edit. I would choose a non-commercial use because I want to reserve the commercial rights (so I could potentially sell it).

    2. The elementary school teacher - Attribution-NoDervis
    - As a teacher, I want to share my work with others but I do not want them to change it (the description says "benefit from" it does not say add/change/edit). I also feel that I created a great resource so I do not care how it is distributed, as long as I receive the credit.

    3. The photographer - Attribution-ShareAlike
    - As a photographer, I would be ok with the original photo being tweaked or built upon. I would still want credit for the original photo.

    No idea if these make sense. I answered the questions before I read everyone else's response. Now that I have compared some answers, I am unsure of my choices (haha).

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    1. I tried to answer the questions on my own without first looking at my classmates response but the route I was taking brought me to another place so I had to back track.

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  20. You are a relatively obscure musician who wants as many people to discover your music as possible, but also wants to be able to reserve the commercial right to sell your work. Which license(s) might you choose?
    - I chose the Attribution-NonCommercial- NoDerivs. I chose this because it allows the musicians music to be heard but not altered in anyway.

    You are an elementary school teacher who has created a great resource on how the solar system works, and want other teachers to benefit. Which license(s) would you choose?
    - for the elementary school teacher I chose attribution- sharealike. I chose this because all teachers have different ideas and new ways to expand on different things so if they can expand what I've created and make it even better and add to it, I'd love to let them, for in the long run it would not only benefit me but also the students.
    You are an amateur photographer who has taken photos of landmarks in your area and want them to be featured in their Wikipedia articles. Which license(s) do you choose?
    - for the photographer I would choose attribution. This allows other to edit my image but they must credit me for the original letting others know where it came from.

    Honestly I would've chose more than one of the licenses for each of these but these were my final choices when having to choose one. I see the benefits with all of these licenses and I can agree with everyone else's choices as well as my own

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    1. I agree. I had to whittle down what I thought was the best choice of license for the product.

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  21. Here is the second part of the first assignment
    Here is the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWrqj5aquio

    Also, I would like to share this link because it was so helpful to watch. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKfqoPYJdVc

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    1. Thanks Heidi, but we were really looking for you to be discussing and teaching it on the video, rather than a post-recap.

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    2. I did both...Just thought the second one was very clear for those who may need further instruction on the terminology.

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  22. This is my take on the questions.
    1. CC BY-NC-ND. The musician wants people to discover his music but not the right to commercially sell it. He also did not give the okay to alter or add anything to it.
    2. CC BY. The school teacher created a great resource on how the solar system works and wants other teachers to benefit from it. She wants to share her work with fellow teachers and give them the opportunity to tweak it to fit their needs.
    3. CC BY-SA. The amateur photographer want his photos featured in Wikipedia articles. Anything Wiki is basically a free for all.

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  23. Here is the link to my first ever YouTube video. Many of you may have seen it as I sent you the link to the adobe spark video yesterday. https://youtu.be/qoLw-f7bjiA

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  24. Part 2 Exercise
    Share what you've found so far - use the discussion tab for this task. Post links to the resources you found.
    Concluding discussion
    My Topic: Backyard Chicken Care
    Were you able to find what you needed? Yes, I was able to find information on my topic on Google advanced search and on creativecommons.org. Were there good repositories or sources of content that were particularly valuable? Somewhat, however, I found it a bit hard to use and It was hard to find the cc license. Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was? Not as easy as I had hoped, however, I feel that if I had more time to dig in, it would get easier. I did use some of the tips that were given to recognize cc licenses and I did start a google sheet to keep track of all of my attributes so that was very helpful. I had done that in my research class as well and it was a huge time saver.
    How might you use the stuff that you found? I am a very visual person so I would use many of the photos that I found. I also like to learn by watching videos. Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen? Yes, but, I also had done some research at the library the old fashioned way, spoke to a local farmer and took a short 3 hour seminar at Allies Tack shop to learn more. So that is how I filled in the gaps.

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  25. Also, let me add. In one of the tasks, "Attribute discussion tab" Elizabeth stated Love the acronym on the best practices for attribution page.

    "A good rule of thumb is to use the acronym TASL, which stands for Title, Author, Source, License" I was up all night ruminating on that as I could not remember what the S stood for. I know now that I will never forget. I was up at 1:38 am looking for my notes to find it. LOL, I could not help but to share that.

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    1. Wow---I never thought I'd say this to a student, but you take this content too seriously.

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  26. Here is the link to my part 2 "Teach it". https://youtu.be/sydSMDEhwb0 This was a lot of work but it added to my research knowledge and I am sure I will utilize creative commons in the future.

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    1. Thanks for this video, Chris. I've always been interested in having my own chickens and you gave us a lot of useful, detailed information. Well done.
      Luz

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    2. Very informative. I've thought about raising many things in my backyard but chickens never came to mind. Very cool.

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    3. I like how you ended by talking about the licenses. Good job

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  27. Hi everyone,
    I have a question regarding the CC license for the musician...

    I noticed the majority of you chose Non-Deriv (ND), and was wondering what you consider a derivative? Is a remixed version of a song a derivative? I decided not to go that route because I would assume an unknown musician would be ok with a remix of his/her work being used as long as it's not used commercially. Thoughts?

    Luz

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    1. A 'derivative' means that you derived your new resource from theirs, so 'non-derivative' means that no one can derive their new resource from yours w/o permission. Although your assumption about the musician may be correct we can't always be sure that an unknown musician would be 'ok' with a remix, so you always need to check with them to be sure.

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    2. Thank you for the clarification

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  28. https://youtu.be/2VpTg5e4GQw Here's my short video from part one... it was done last night but refused to download on my laptop even when I left it downloading overnight... I had to download the app onto my phone and do it from there

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  29. Sorry for delay. This is my part one assignment.
    https://youtu.be/9CNwq3bEsUY
    This was fun but more difficult than I thought.

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  30. Ok here is part 1 of the assignment. Me trying to explain copyright and creative commons to Joe and Matt.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq5J5_w5U4Q

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  31. It's neat how everyone is taking a different approach to the creative commons discussion video. I love it. There is more then one way to peel a banana or is it skin a cat?

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  32. Nice job Stephanie, Were those your cousins pictures that you used? They were beautiful. I liked the real example you used as well.

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  33. 1. You are a relatively obscure musician who wants as many people to discover your music as possible, but also wants to be able to reserve the commercial right to sell your work. Which license(s) might you choose?

    Because creating music is a deeply personal, private expression of art, I chose Attribution-Non-Commercial No Dervis so that the music could be heard by others but the artist could maintain control over who is allowed to share it.

    2. You are an elementary school teacher who has created a great resource on how the solar system works, and want other teachers to benefit. Which license(s) would you choose?

    Being a teacher, we learned that it is important to share our work with our students and fellow instructors. For this reason, I chose Attribution-that way it could be shared with a certain group, but not shared with just anyone.

    3. You are an amateur photographer who has taken photos of landmarks in your area and want them to be featured in their Wikipedia articles. Which license(s) do you choose?

    Attribution-Share alike is what I chose for this scenario because it will be used in Wikipedia. When placing information there, one knows that it is for public use to share and to edit without boundaries.
    Sharyn

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  34. Here is the link to my video on Creative Commons https://spark.adobe.com/video/3G42Gpwt6wH8w

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  35. Ok here is my teach it video: The game of Golf! Enjoy!!
    https://spark.adobe.com/video/lpmN1viOokw8m

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    1. Loved it! Great job Paula. I will say, I never knew golf had so many rules. I have never played because I have a hard time waiting my turn. :)

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  36. 1. You are a relatively obscure musician who wants as many people to discover your music as possible, but also wants to be able to reserve the commercial right to sell your work. Which license(s) might you choose?

    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

    I chose this option because I felt that the musician would like to distribute the music to allow people to listen to it, but if it became really popular I’m sure the musician would like to profit from the work.

    2. You are an elementary school teacher who has created a great resource on how the solar system works, and want other teachers to benefit. Which license(s) would you choose?

    Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International

    In this case, I feel that going along with David Wiley’s TED talk, the teacher would want to share the work. However, I think the teacher that created the work would want others to share alike and not base their work off of this resource and then restrict others from using it.

    3. You are an amateur photographer who has taken photos of landmarks in your area and want them to be featured in their Wikipedia articles. Which license(s) do you choose?

    Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International

    I think for this Wikipedia use, the idea is to allow others to use and share the photos, in a non-commercial fashion.

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    1. Nice job Paul - hope you're feeling better!!

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  38. Were you able to find what you needed? Yes.

    Were there good repositories or sources of content that were particularly valuable?
    I went to OER Commons first so, yes.

    How about any that were hard to use?
    I found Vimeo hard because it had a lot of ads and for-fee resume writing videos. It was hard to distinguish between what was free instruction and what was an ad for a for-fee service or video.

    Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was?
    Most of the time, yes. YouTube allows people to utilize the Creative Commons labels but it is not as visible as on other sites like OER Commons.

    How might you use the stuff that you found?
    I would like to develop a resource for my students who want and can use the internet to access information we have covered in our resume writing session.

    Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen? Yes.

    What's missing and how might you fill the gaps?
    My students’ technology skills and even their access to technology varies dramatically. We may have to add some open lab time each night before classes start to guarantee that students can utilize the tools. These modes for learning are great for people who are auditory and visual learners but I would still create printed versions of tools pictured for those who are tactile/kinesthetic learners.

    I'm glad I have learned more about these terms and services. In the future, I can envision helping staff prepare materials for their instruction. It helps to have this knowledge in my toolbox.

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  39. Hi everyone!

    Here is my teaching video on Community of Learning. I posted my resources a few days ago but they seem to have disappeared so I included them at the end of my video.

    https://youtu.be/l_32u4B4-zg

    Luz

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  40. Luz, What a great job you did. You seem so natural.

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    Replies
    1. Very Good Luz, You always look so cute with your headphone on :)

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  41. Were you able to find what you needed?

    Yes, I found a lot of information on the web about performing CPR.

    Were there good repositories or sources of content that were particularly valuable?

    The American Red Cross has a lot of great information, and OER Commons led me to a First Aid Guide that had a lot of great info as well.

    How about any that were hard to use?

    None were hard to use.

    Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was?

    In general, yes, I found information about the license on the bottom of the page in most cases.

    How might you use the stuff that you found?

    I could compile this information into a manual, create a small card to carry with you, and produce a video containing this information.

    Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen?

    Yes, the information is sufficient, there are several videos already available and guides in pdf format.

    What's missing and how might you fill the gaps?

    What is missing is that I could not certify people, I would need to have them attend a Red Cross sanctioned training for them to obtain their CPR card.

    I was able to find a lot of information on Wikipedia, it was pretty amazing to see how much information it out there!

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  42. Here is my “Teach It” video. https://spark.adobe.com/video/SJcVjzmu

    All of the photos used were from two sources – Flickr: Creative Commons and Free Stock Images. All were CCO Universal licensed.

    My references:
    https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/Recognizing_licensed_work

    https://www.oercommons.org/courses/encouraging-student-academic-motivation

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_community

    https://www.communitycommons.org/?s=fundraising

    Sharyn

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  43. Here is my "teach it" video https://spark.adobe.com/video/BiQbQtNtb7NIb
    I used Google Free Images and Free stock Images. All had universal license.

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    Replies
    1. Wow - great info Heidi. I learned a lot - I'll be going to you to update my resume!!
      Sharyn

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  44. Here is my "teach it" video. https://youtu.be/aCK0D4dOqPw
    I created this for my geometry class. Hopefully I get some use out of it.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Jen - great work. You can easily use this in a classroom. You are a natural!!
      Sharyn

      Delete
  45. Here is my "teach it" video: "GED Exam Preparation."
    https://spark.adobe.com/video/rJAlmNEu
    I used Google Free Images and all had Universal Licenses.

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    Replies
    1. Great job Gail. We know that those who need to begin the GED process always need guidance. This would be so helpful!!
      Sharyn

      Delete
  46. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  47. Here is my teach it video : https://youtu.be/bMI4tP482QQ

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  48. Hi All,
    It was so good to see everyone in person last night. I learned about many things (even dreaded Math! blech!!) while watching your creations. Thank you for expanding my knowledge.

    Here is my video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVloCEQAxA4

    Please know that you have inspired me to consider a blog or Wiki for our ongoing professional development of our staff. My video will be one of a series developed for our students' use since their class time is limited.

    Have wonderful holidays!

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